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5 Key Differences Between Agile Adoption and Agile Transformation

A common question I get during my Agile training courses is what is the difference between Agile Adoption and Agile Transformation. It's a great question. I see five key differences worth talking about.

 

But first let's agree on our terminology. These are my working definitions for these two terms though I realize that people don't use these two terms consistently.

Your How-To Guide For Success with an Agile Methodology

Looking for resources to help you succeed with Scrum or another Agile Methodology? You’ve come to the right place. Bookmark this guide and leverage it for all questions you have related to Piloting Agile, Agile and Scrum Training, and Agile Transformation.

Leaders Go First in an Agile Transformation

I met with some of the key internal Agile champions at a client recently and they asked for my help. They were leading the Agile Transformation in their organization and were supporting their teams to improve and mature their practices. Unfortunately, they found that their teams had hit a brick wall and were not progressing.

That brick wall was the executive leadership team. The leadership team said they wanted the benefits of Agile but frequently acted in ways that undercut the agile teams. The attitude of the leadership team seems to be:

How to Increase Agile Adoption in Your Organization

It is an interesting conundrum - managers and leaders say they want to be more Agile, yet they are usually the ones who are responsible for putting the brakes on further Agile Adoption. It is a lot like me saying that I want to get 6 pack abs but I don't want to exercise or eat healthy food. What I say is not aligned with my actions.

So why do I say that managers are putting on the brakes on Agile? Well, first it's because it is what I've seen happen at one organization after another. Managers and leaders control what is happening - directly or indirectly. 

Agile and Scrum Success Story - Bank of America

Do you think that your organization is too large or too old to succeed with Agile and Scrum? This article describes how the leadership team for the Global Markets at Bank of America invested in Scrum Training and Agile Coaching to successfully adopt Agile and Scrum.  The move from waterfall to Scrum was the firsts step in a broader Agile Transformation which was led by key Agile Leaders.  A detailed write-up of this Bank of America Client Success story is available for download.

What is the Leader's Role in an Agile Transformation?

Many organizations today are running Agile pilots or are attempting an Agile Transformation. They want the flexibility and business agility that Agile methods promise. Leaders play a key role in the Agile Transformation. It is only with a solid understanding of this critical role that the transformation will succeed and deliver the promised benefits.

The 5 Vital Relationships That All Agile Leaders Need (part 2)

In my previous post, I introduced the first 3 of 5 relationships that I consider vital for Agile Leaders, or leaders in any context. This post contains the fourth and fifth relationships.

The 5 Vital Relationships That All Agile Leaders Need (part 1)

Success as an Agile Leader is not about Working Harder

If you find yourself working harder than ever but not getting the results you want, perhaps more hard work is not the answer. Leaders today - Agile Leaders or otherwise - need to do more than simply work hard; they need leverage. That leverage comes from building relationships.

Don't Overlook this Requirement for High Performing Teams

Most leaders would claim that they want high-performing teams but many of them don't know what it takes to create them. In some cases, leaders actually behave in ways that undermine high-performing teams.

Can Leaders Create High Performing Teams?

How do you create High-Performance Teams?  More specifically, how do you create high-performing teams from your current employees?

Ask, Don’t Tell - How Agile Leaders Nurture High-Performing Teams

One of the most underutilized tools in the Agile Leaders toolkit is the question. Asking great questions is a powerful way to lead and to nurture high performing teams. Done well, this style of leadership moves from directing, telling and commanding to one of curiosity, learning, and adaptation. And it is a style that anyone can learn to use effectively.

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